Head Keeper’s Quarters

The head keeper’s quarters is located one level above the galley. The head keeper enjoyed more privacy, since the stairs passed outside his doorway and he could close his door. His level was also provided with a walk-in closet beneath the stairs and a cupboard for storage. One assumes the keeper also had his personal bag or steamer trunk and perhaps a chest of drawers for additional storage while on duty. There is evidence that pegs or dowels were inserted into the brick walls to provide hangars for clothing or coats.

The furniture in both keepers’ quarters was most likely functional, but unremarkable, government-issue items: a bed or cot and, for the head keeper, probably a small desk.

The head keepers' quarters is located one level above the galley. The head keeper enjoyed more privacy, since the stairs passed outside his doorway and he could close his door. His level was also provided with a walk-in closet beneath the stairs and a cupboard for storage. One assumes the keeper also had his personal bag or steamer trunk and perhaps a chest of drawers for additional storage while on duty. There is evidence that pegs or dowels were inserted into the brick walls to provide hangars for clothing or coats.  Most of the furniture in both keepers' quarters were most likely functional, but unremarkable government-issue items: a bed or cot and, for the head keeper, probably a small desk.  In the ceiling adjacent to the center column is the shape of what was once a six-inch hole. This hole allowed the small weight from the lens clockwork to extend from the lantern room, providing room for the weight to move up and down as it was wound and the clockwork ran down, turning the lens.  Like the galley below, the windows in the keepers' quarters were once sash windows and could be opened for ventilation in the summer. The windows also provided convenient access to the top of the main gallery roof for maintenance and painting.  The Trust has furnished the head keepers' quarters with representative furniture to recreate the feel of a turn-of-the-century lighthouse, but the furnishings cannot be considered accurate as no photographs of the interior of the lighthouse have been discovered.

Head keepers’ quarters.

In the ceiling adjacent to the center column is the shape of what was once a six-inch hole. This hole allowed the small weight from the lens clockwork to extend from the lantern room, providing room for the weight to move up and down as it was wound and the clockwork ran down, turning the lens.

Like the galley below, the windows in the keepers’ quarters were once sash windows and could be opened for ventilation in the summer. The windows also provided convenient access to the top of the main gallery roof for maintenance and painting.

The Trust has furnished the head keeper’s quarters with representative furniture to recreate the feel of a turn-of-the-century lighthouse, but the furnishings cannot be considered accurate as no photographs of the interior of the lighthouse have been discovered.